An access permission model for slave repositories depends on the current VisualSVN Server authentication settings. With Windows authentication enabled, these permissions will always match the permissions of the corresponding master repository. With Subversion authentication enabled, a slave repository has a separate permission set. It is maintained independently and is unaffected by the permissions of the master repository.

When Windows authentication is enabled on the slave server

Access permissions for a slave VDFS repository are shared with the corresponding master repository if you have Windows authentication enabled on the slave server. In other words, a slave VDFS repository has exactly the same permission settings as the corresponding master (assuming that Windows authentication is also enabled on the master VisualSVN Server). When permissions are modified for the master repository, the modifications are automatically replicated to the slave.

You can use VisualSVN Server Manager to examine the current slave permissions. However, they cannot be modified directly — in order to alter the permissions for a slave repository, you should instead change the permissions for the corresponding master repository. These changes will be automatically replicated to the slave.

When Subversion authentication is enabled on the slave server

There is a separate set of access permissions for a slave VDFS repository if you have Subversion authentication enabled on the slave server. You can manage and modify access permissions directly for a slave repository in that case. In other words, no replication of permissions settings is performed from the master if you have Subversion authentication enabled on the particular slave server.

See also

KB68: Getting started with Multisite Repository Replication

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