Name

svn log — Display commit log messages.

Synopsis

svn log [PATH]

svn log URL[@REV] [PATH...]

Description

Shows log messages from the repository. If no arguments are supplied, svn log shows the log messages for all files and directories inside (and including) the current working directory of your working copy. You can refine the results by specifying a path, one or more revisions, or any combination of the two. The default revision range for a local path is BASE:1.

If you specify a URL alone, it prints log messages for everything the URL contains. If you add paths past the URL, only messages for those paths under that URL will be printed. The default revision range for a URL is HEAD:1.

With --verbose (-v), svn log will also print all affected paths with each log message. With --quiet (-q), svn log will not print the log message body itself, this is compatible with --verbose (-v).

Each log message is printed just once, even if more than one of the affected paths for that revision were explicitly requested. Logs follow copy history by default. Use --stop-on-copy to disable this behavior, which can be useful for determining branch points.

Examples

You can see the log messages for all the paths that changed in your working copy by running svn log from the top:

$ svn log
------------------------------------------------------------------------
r20 | harry | 2003-01-17 22:56:19 -0600 (Fri, 17 Jan 2003) | 1 line

Tweak.
------------------------------------------------------------------------
r17 | sally | 2003-01-16 23:21:19 -0600 (Thu, 16 Jan 2003) | 2 lines
…

Examine all log messages for a particular file in your working copy:

$ svn log foo.c
------------------------------------------------------------------------
r32 | sally | 2003-01-13 00:43:13 -0600 (Mon, 13 Jan 2003) | 1 line

Added defines.
------------------------------------------------------------------------
r28 | sally | 2003-01-07 21:48:33 -0600 (Tue, 07 Jan 2003) | 3 lines
…

If you don't have a working copy handy, you can log a URL:

$ svn log http://svn.red-bean.com/repos/test/foo.c
------------------------------------------------------------------------
r32 | sally | 2003-01-13 00:43:13 -0600 (Mon, 13 Jan 2003) | 1 line

Added defines.
------------------------------------------------------------------------
r28 | sally | 2003-01-07 21:48:33 -0600 (Tue, 07 Jan 2003) | 3 lines
…

If you want several distinct paths underneath the same URL, you can use the URL [PATH...] syntax:

$ svn log http://svn.red-bean.com/repos/test/ foo.c bar.c
------------------------------------------------------------------------
r32 | sally | 2003-01-13 00:43:13 -0600 (Mon, 13 Jan 2003) | 1 line

Added defines.
------------------------------------------------------------------------
r31 | harry | 2003-01-10 12:25:08 -0600 (Fri, 10 Jan 2003) | 1 line

Added new file bar.c
------------------------------------------------------------------------
r28 | sally | 2003-01-07 21:48:33 -0600 (Tue, 07 Jan 2003) | 3 lines
…

The --verbose (-v) option causes svn log to include information about the paths that were changed in each displayed revision. These paths appear, one path per line of output, with action codes that indicate what type of change was made to the path.

$ svn log -v http://svn.red-bean.com/repos/test/ foo.c bar.c
------------------------------------------------------------------------
r32 | sally | 2003-01-13 00:43:13 -0600 (Mon, 13 Jan 2003) | 1 line
Changed paths:
   M /foo.c

Added defines.
------------------------------------------------------------------------
r31 | harry | 2003-01-10 12:25:08 -0600 (Fri, 10 Jan 2003) | 1 line
Changed paths:
   A /bar.c

Added new file bar.c
------------------------------------------------------------------------
r28 | sally | 2003-01-07 21:48:33 -0600 (Tue, 07 Jan 2003) | 3 lines
…

svn log uses just a handful of action codes, and they are similar to the ones the svn update command uses:

A

The item was added.

D

The item was deleted.

M

Properties or textual contents on the item were changed.

R

The item was replaced by a different one at the same location.

In addition to the action codes which precede the changed paths, svn log with the --verbose (-v) option will note whether a path was added or replaced as the result of a copy operation. It does so by printing (from COPY-FROM-PATH:COPY-FROM-REV) after such paths.

When you're concatenating the results of multiple calls to the log command, you may want to use the --incremental option. svn log normally prints out a dashed line at the beginning of a log message, after each subsequent log message, and following the final log message. If you ran svn log on a range of two revisions, you would get this:

$ svn log -r 14:15
------------------------------------------------------------------------
r14 | …

------------------------------------------------------------------------
r15 | …

------------------------------------------------------------------------

However, if you wanted to gather two nonsequential log messages into a file, you might do something like this:

$ svn log -r 14 > mylog
$ svn log -r 19 >> mylog
$ svn log -r 27 >> mylog
$ cat mylog
------------------------------------------------------------------------
r14 | …

------------------------------------------------------------------------
------------------------------------------------------------------------
r19 | …

------------------------------------------------------------------------
------------------------------------------------------------------------
r27 | …

------------------------------------------------------------------------

You can avoid the clutter of the double dashed lines in your output by using the --incremental option:

$ svn log --incremental -r 14 > mylog
$ svn log --incremental -r 19 >> mylog
$ svn log --incremental -r 27 >> mylog
$ cat mylog
------------------------------------------------------------------------
r14 | …

------------------------------------------------------------------------
r19 | …

------------------------------------------------------------------------
r27 | …

The --incremental option provides similar output control when using the --xml option:

$ svn log --xml --incremental -r 1 sandwich.txt
<logentry
   revision="1">
<author>harry</author>
<date>2008-06-03T06:35:53.048870Z</date>
<msg>Initial Import.</msg>
</logentry>
Tip
Tip

Sometimes when you run svn log on a specific path and a specific revision, you see no log information output at all, as in the following:

$ svn log -r 20 http://svn.red-bean.com/untouched.txt
------------------------------------------------------------------------

That just means the path wasn't modified in that revision. To get log information for that revision, either run the log operation against the repository's root URL, or specify a path that you happen to know was changed in that revision:

$ svn log -r 20 touched.txt 
------------------------------------------------------------------------
r20 | sally | 2003-01-17 22:56:19 -0600 (Fri, 17 Jan 2003) | 1 line

Made a change.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Beginning with Subversion 1.7, users can take advantage of a special output mode which combines the information from svn log with what you would see when running svn diff on the same targets for each revision of the log. Simply invoke svn log with the --diff option to trigger this output mode.

$ svn log -r 20 touched.txt --diff
------------------------------------------------------------------------
r20 | sally | 2003-01-17 22:56:19 -0600 (Fri, 17 Jan 2003) | 1 line

Made a change.

Index: touched.txt
===================================================================
--- touched.txt	(revision 19)
+++ touched.txt	(revision 20)
@@ -1 +1,2 @@
 This is the file 'touched.txt'.
+We add such exciting text to files around here!
------------------------------------------------------------------------
$

As with svn diff, you may also make use of many of the various options which control the way the difference is generated, including --depth, --diff-cmd, and --extensions (-x).